Message Board Our Chart News-letter MySpace
L HOME
LIFE
+ Cast bios
+ Crew
+ Season 1 Episodes
+ Season 2 Episodes
+ Season 3 Episodes
+ Season 4 Episodes
+ Season 5 Episodes
+ Season 6 Episodes
+ Spoilers

+ Trivia
LOVE
+ Pre-season 1 couples
+ Season 1 Couples
+ Season 2 Couples
+ Season 3 Couples
+ Gossip
LOOK
+ Pictures
+ Screencaps
+ Videos
+ Promo clips
LISTEN
+ Score
+ Soundtrack
+ Podcasts
+ Bands featured in L
+ Audio Interviews
+ We Recommend
LITERARY
+ Magazine articles
+ Online articles
+
Quotes

+ Books
L SPECIALS
+ TV Specials
+ DVD Info
+ Awards
+ Cast/Crew interviews
+ US Promotions
+ HRC San Fran Prog Ad
LOCATIONS
+ Filming Locations
+ Event Locations

+ Current filming
+ Star Spotting
L CREATIONS
+ LWO Wallpapers
+ Fan Wallpapers

+ Fanart

+ Music Videos
L WEAR
+ Exclusive LWO Tshirts
+ Other tshirts

+ Fan shirt page
L'INTERNATIONAL
+ Airdates and DVD release info
+ International Promotions
+ Links to international sites
LEISURE
+ Lets go shopping
+ Charities Donations List
+ Look like the cast
+ L Ward Comic
+
Slicey Recommends

+ L Word Sing-a-long
+ Previous poll results
+ Oz and Slicey's TOP 5
+
Holiday Gift Guide
LIBERTY
+ View Guestbook
+ Write in Guestbook

+ Message Boards
LUCK
+ Competitions
LINKS
+ Other websites we like
+ If you want to link to us
ABOUT US
L FAQ
ADVERTISE
L CONTACT


Search the site

SPONSORED LINKS


:: S P E C I A L  H O N O R E E ::
Jennifer Beals


Had it not been for Jennifer Beals, the character of Bette Porter in the hit Showtime series “The L Word” would not have been biracial. Beals convinced producer Ilene Chaiken to make Bette mixed, “so I could serve all those people who were like me and had never seen themselves represented except for maybe in a Benetton ad,” she told the audience at the POWER UP benefit gala in November 2004.

In a stirring speech, Beals talked about noticing the lack of media representations of mixed race people when she was growing up: “Somehow my story wasn't there. I was too young to start reading Faulkner, I hadn't seen ‘Imitation of Life’ and so I wasn't aware that I was supposed to be the insane, oversexed tragic Mulatto gal. Certainly my otherness sometimes was so palpable it was a wonder that anyone could see me. I was that invisible. And certainly when society fails to write your story there is an unspoken message that the story is not worth telling.”

We applaud Jennifer Beals’ dedication to telling the stories of biracial people. From her portrayal of the mysterious femme fatale Daphne Monet who passes as white in the 1995 film noir “Devil in a Blue Dress,” to her rendering of the Civil War-era biracial plantation heiress Amanda Dickson in the 2000 TV movie “A House Divided,” to her current role as Bette Porter on “The L Word,” she has demonstrated an unwavering commitment to promoting the visibility of mixed race people in a thought-provoking manner.



































































































 


The L Word Online has been designed by Oz and Slicey.  Unique images designed by Oz.  Site maintained by Oz & Slicey.  This website is intended to be fun and informative, and was created with respect to show appreciation for the women and men involved in the creation of TV's first real lesbian drama.  This site is not endorsed, sponsored, or affiliated with Showtime Networks Inc., the television series "The L Word," or any person involved in the making of the show.  No copyright infringement is intended.  Images and other borrowed content are copyright their respective owners.  Credit is given where due.  All original content is the sole property of  the creators of The L Word Online copyright October 2003.